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Sex Roles

, Volume 42, Issue 11–12, pp 947–967 | Cite as

The Gender Belief System, Authoritarianism, Social Dominance Orientation, and Heterosexuals' Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men

  • Bernard E. WhitleyJr.
  • Stefanía Ægisdóttir
Article

Abstract

We tested hypotheses drawn from three theoretical perspectives—gender belief system, authoritarianism, and social dominance—concerning heterosexuals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. Data from 122 male and 131 female heterosexual college students with mostly White, middle-class backgrounds indicated that constructs postulated by all three perspectives played important roles in predicting attitudes: Gender differences in attitudes toward lesbians and gay men were mediated by social dominance orientation and gender-role beliefs, indicating that gender role beliefs may act as legitimizing myths to justify antigay attitudes. Authoritarianism had both a direct relationship to attitudes toward lesbians and gay men and an indirect relationship mediated by gender-role beliefs.

Keywords

Gender Difference College Student Social Psychology Gender Role Direct Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard E. WhitleyJr.
    • 1
  • Stefanía Ægisdóttir
    • 2
  1. 1.Ball State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Ball State UniversityUSA

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