Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 179–209 | Cite as

A New Test to Measure Emotion Recognition Ability: Matsumoto and Ekman's Japanese and Caucasian Brief Affect Recognition Test (JACBART)

  • David Matsumoto
  • Jeff LeRoux
  • Carinda Wilson-Cohn
  • Jake Raroque
  • Kristie Kooken
  • Paul Ekman
  • Nathan Yrizarry
  • Sherry Loewinger
  • Hideko Uchida
  • Albert Yee
  • Lisa Amo
  • Angeline Goh

Abstract

In this article, we report the development of a new test designed to measure individual differences in emotion recognition ability (ERA), five studies examining the reliability and validity of the scores produced using this test, and the first evidence for a correlation between ERA measured by a standardized test and personality. Utilizing Matsumoto and Ekman's (1988) Japanese and Caucasian Facial Expressions of Emotion (JACFEE) and Neutral Faces (JACNeuF), we call this measure the Japanese and Caucasian Brief Affect Recognition Test (JACBART). The JACBART improves on previous measures of ERA by (1) using expressions that have substantial validity and reliability data associated with them, (2) including posers of two visibly different races (3) balanced across seven universal emotions (4) with equal distribution of poser race and sex across emotions (5) in a format that eliminates afterimages associated with fast exposures. Scores derived using the JACBART are reliable, and three studies demonstrated a correlation between ERA and the personality constructs of Openness and Conscientiousness, while one study reports a correlation with Extraversion and Neuroticism.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Jeff LeRoux
    • 2
  • Carinda Wilson-Cohn
    • 2
  • Jake Raroque
    • 2
  • Kristie Kooken
    • 2
  • Paul Ekman
    • 3
  • Nathan Yrizarry
    • 2
  • Sherry Loewinger
    • 2
  • Hideko Uchida
    • 2
  • Albert Yee
    • 2
  • Lisa Amo
    • 2
  • Angeline Goh
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySan Francisco State UniversitySan Francisco
  2. 2.San Francisco State UniversityUSA
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaSan Francisco

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