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New Forests

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 37–51 | Cite as

Vegetative propagation of Inga feuillei from shoot cuttings and air layering

  • Eric B. Brennan
  • Kenneth W. Mudge
Article

Abstract

Cuttage and air layering were evaluated as means of vegetative propagation of the tropical woody tree, Inga feuillei. Effects of moisture management systems, leafiness, auxin application, and stem diameter on rooting of semihardwood cuttings were investigated. Cuttings were taken from 2-year-old seed-propagated, greenhouse-grown stock plants. Compound leaves were either reduced in area or removed entirely before auxin pretreatment with 0, 0.3, or 0.8% indolebutyric acid (IBA) followed by sticking under mist or in a polyethylene enclosure. Leafless cuttings did not root regardless of moisture management system or auxin pretreatment, whereas 55% rooting of leafy cuttings was observed. Leafy cuttings rooted significantly better under mist than in a polyethylene enclosure. Auxin treatment at the higher level increased rooting percentage approximately two fold for larger diameter cuttings (8.1 to 20 mm), but had no effect on the smaller cuttings (2 to 8 mm), and resulted in an approximately three fold increase in the number of roots/rooted cutting for both stem diameter classes. Auxin treatment did not affect rooting percentage of leafy softwood cuttings under fog, however it did increase the number of roots per rooted cutting. One hundred percent of air layered shoots rooted within 5 weeks with or without auxin pretreatment, and all rooted layers survived transplanting to soil. Possible implications of this research on agroforestry, selection, genetic improvement, and conservation are discussed.

cuttage auxin marcottage mist polyethylene 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric B. Brennan
    • 1
  • Kenneth W. Mudge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Floriculture and Ornamental HorticultureCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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