Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 62, Issue 3, pp 187–193

Pilot-scale culture of adventitious roots of ginseng in a bioreactor system

  • Sung Mee Choi
  • Sung Ho Son
  • Seung Rho Yun
  • Oh Woung Kwon
  • Jeong Hoon Seon
  • Kee Yoeup Paek
Article

Abstract

A pilot-scale culture of multiple adventitious roots of ginseng was established using a balloon-type bubble bioreactor. Adventitious roots (2 cm) induced from callus were cultured in plastic Petri dishes having 20 ml of solid Schenk and Hildebrandt (1972) medium containing 3% sucrose, 0.15% gelrite, and 24.6 μM indole-3-butric acid. An average of 29 secondary multiple adventitious roots were produced after 4 weeks of culture. These secondary roots were elongated on the same medium, reaching a length of 5 cm after 6 weeks of culture. A time course study revealed that maximum yields in 5-l and 20-l bioreactors were approximately 500 g and 2.2 kg at day 42 with 60 g and 240 g inoculations, respectively. Cutting twice during the culture increased the total amount of biomass produced. The root biomass in a 20-l balloon-type bubble bioreactor was 2.8 kg at harvest with 240 g of inoculum after 8 weeks of culture. The total saponin content obtained from small-scale and pilot-scale balloon type bubble bioreactors was around 1% based on dry weight. Inoculation of 500 g fresh weight of multiple adventitious roots into a 500 l balloon-type bubble bioreactor with cutting at 4 and 6 weeks after inoculation produced approximately 74.8 kg of multiple roots. The ginsengnoside profiles of these multiple adventitious roots were similar to profiles of field-grown ginseng roots when analyzed by HPLC.

bioreactor culture ginseng saponin Panax ginseng root growth 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sung Mee Choi
    • 1
  • Sung Ho Son
    • 1
    • 1
  • Seung Rho Yun
    • 1
  • Oh Woung Kwon
    • 1
  • Jeong Hoon Seon
    • 2
  • Kee Yoeup Paek
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Biotechnology, Forestry Research InstituteForestry Administration OmokdongKwonseon-gu, SuwonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Biological ScienceUniversity of CalgaryN. W. CalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Research Center for the Development of Advanced Horticultural TechnologyChungbuk National UniversityCheongju, ChungbukRepublic of Korea

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