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Biogeochemistry

, Volume 49, Issue 3, pp 191–215 | Cite as

Dynamics of dissolved O2, CO2, CH4, and N2O in a tropical coastal swamp in southern Thailand

  • Shingo Ueda
  • Chun-Sim U. Go
  • Takahito Yoshioka
  • Naohiro Yoshida* ast;
  • Eitaro Wada
  • Toshihiro Miyajima* ast ast;
  • Atsuko Sugimoto
  • Narin Boontanon
  • Pisoot Vijarnsorn
  • Suporn Boonprakub
Article

Abstract

We studied the distribution of dissolved O2, CO2, CH4, and N2O in a coastal swamp system in Thailand with the goal to characterize the dynamics of these gases within the system. The gas concentrations varied spatially and seasonally in both surface and ground waters. The entire system was a strong sourcefor CO2 and CH4, and a possible sink for atmospheric N2O. Seasonal variation in precipitation primarily regulated the redox conditions in the system. However, distributions of CO2, CH4, and N2O in the river that received swamp waters were not always in agreement with redox conditions indicated by dissolvedO2 concentrations. Sulfate production through pyriteoxidation occurred in the swamp with thin peat layerunder aerobic conditions and was reflected by elevatedSO 4 2− /Cl in the river water. When SO 4 2− /Cl was high, CO2 and CH4 concentrations decreased, whereas the N2O concentration increased. The excess SO 4 2− in the river water was thus identified as a potential indicator for gas dynamics in this coastal swamp system.

carbon dioxide coastal peat swamp methane nitrous oxide oxygen pyrite oxidation redox condition 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shingo Ueda
    • 1
  • Chun-Sim U. Go
    • 1
  • Takahito Yoshioka
    • 2
  • Naohiro Yoshida* ast;
    • 2
  • Eitaro Wada
    • 3
  • Toshihiro Miyajima* ast ast;
    • 3
  • Atsuko Sugimoto
    • 3
  • Narin Boontanon
    • 3
  • Pisoot Vijarnsorn
    • 4
  • Suporn Boonprakub
    • 4
  1. 1.National Institute for Resources and EnvironmentIbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Institute for Hydrospheric-Atmospheric SciencesNagoya University, Chikusa, NagoyaAichiJapan
  3. 3.Center for Ecological ResearchKyoto UniversityShigaJapan
  4. 4.Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan)

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