Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 57–63 | Cite as

Localization of peroxidase mRNAs in soybean seeds by in situ hybridization

  • Mark Gijzen
  • S. Shea Miller
  • Lu-Ann Bowman
  • Anthea K. Batchelor
  • Kim Boutilier
  • Brian L.A. Miki
Article

Abstract

The soybean Ep gene encodes an anionic peroxidase enzyme that accumulates in large amounts in seed coat tissues. We have isolated a second peroxidase gene, Prx2, that is also highly expressed in developing seed coat tissues. Sequence analysis of Prx2 cDNA indicates that this transcript encodes a cationic peroxidase isozyme that is far removed from Ep in peroxidase phylogeny. To determine the expression patterns for these two peroxidases in developing seeds, the abundance and localization of the Ep and Prx2 transcripts were compared by in situ hybridization. Results show the expression of Ep begins in a small number of cells flanking the vascular bundle in the seed coat, spreads to encircle the seed, and then migrates to the hourglass cells as they develop. Expression of Prx2 occurs throughout development in all cell layers of the seed coat, and is also evident in the pericarp and embryo. Nonetheless, the Ep-encoded enzyme accounts for virtually all of the peroxidase activity detected in mature seed coats. The Prx2 enzyme is either insoluble in a catalytically inactive form, or is subject to degradation during seed maturation.

embryo gene expression Glycine max oxidoreductase seed coat testa 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Gijzen
    • 1
  • S. Shea Miller
    • 2
  • Lu-Ann Bowman
    • 2
  • Anthea K. Batchelor
    • 2
  • Kim Boutilier
    • 2
  • Brian L.A. Miki
    • 2
  1. 1.Southern Crop Protection and Food Research CentreLondonCanada
  2. 2.Eastern Cereals and Oilseeds Research CentreOttawaCanada

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