Veterinary Research Communications

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 213–228

Prospects for Plant Anthelmintics in Tropical Veterinary Medicine

  • J.A. Hammond
  • D. Fielding
  • S.C. Bishop
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1005884429253

Cite this article as:
Hammond, J., Fielding, D. & Bishop, S. Vet Res Commun (1997) 21: 213. doi:10.1023/A:1005884429253

Abstract

Hammond, J.A., Fielding, D. and Bishop, S.C., 1997. Prospects for plant anthelmintics in tropical veterinary medicine. Veterinary Research Communications, 21 (3), 213-228

The current use of anthelmintic plants in tropical veterinary medicine is reviewed and attention is drawn to the lack of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of many now in use. The case for anthelmintic plants as a means of overcoming some of the serious limitations of manufactured anthelmintics is outlined. Reasons why anthelmintic plants are not generally used in veterinary medicine, in contrast to their greater acceptance in human medicine, are considered. Strategies for their development and use are discussed, in particular the need for in vivo trials to identify those plants which are effective and suitable for general use: attention is drawn to possible candidates, including pyrethrum and papaya latex. Those helminths of most economic importance should be targeted first. Anthelmintic plants offer a traditional alternative to manufactured anthelmintics that is both sustainable and environmentally acceptable. Such plants could have a more important role in the future control of helminth infections in the tropics.

anthelmintic ethnology herbal medicine phytotherapy plant 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J.A. Hammond
    • 1
  • D. Fielding
    • 1
  • S.C. Bishop
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Tropical Veterinary MedicineRoyal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of EdinburghScotlandUK

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