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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 30, Issue 6, pp 585–593 | Cite as

System and Cost Research Issues in Treatments for People with Autistic Disorders

  • John W. Jacobson
  • James A. Mulick
Article

Abstract

Parents of children with autism and pervasive developmental disorder and educational and clinical practitioners providing services to them regularly confront a wide range of service selection and financial decisions that are not as yet effectively addressed by applied research. Relevant systems issues span a very broad range of concerns: (a) systems delivery models and issues (e.g., costs of services, implementation of intensive intervention, and teacher or therapist training); (b) how best to integrate treatments; (c) providing treatment to those with limited monetary resources; (d) cost and cost/benefit analyses; (e) how to educate adult psychiatrists (as well as other practitioners and personnel) regarding autism; and (f) gaps between research and practice.

Autism cost service selection early intensive behavioral intervention 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Jacobson
    • 1
    • 2
  • James A. Mulick
    • 3
  1. 1.New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental DisabilitiesBureau of Planning and Service DesignAlbany
  2. 2.Independent Living in the Capital District, Inc.Schenectady
  3. 3.Departments of Pediatrics and PsychologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbus

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