Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 223–227 | Cite as

Direct conversion of cellulose to methane by anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis and defined methanogens

  • Yutaka Nakashimada
  • Karthikeyan Srinivasan
  • Makoto Murakami
  • Naomichi Nishio
Article

Abstract

Co-cultures of N. frontalis with a formate-utilizing methanogen, Methanobacterium formicicum and/or an aceticlastic methanogen, Methanosaeta concilii, were performed for methane production from cellulose. In the co-culture with M. formicicum, ca. 16 mM CH4 was produced after 7 days without accumulation of H2 and formate. In the co-culture with M. concilii, 12 mM CH4 was produced after 17 days with decreasing acetate production. In the tri-culture of N. frontalis with M. formicicum and M. concilii, 24 mM CH4 was produced after 17 days where acetate still remained at 23 mM, but production of lactate and ethanol decreased. When a 4-times concentrated culture broth of M. concilii was inoculated in this tri-culture system in a bioreactor, 150 mM CH4 was produced after 24 days by feeding of cellulose, although 57 mM acetate still accumulated.

cellulose co-culture methane fermentation methanogens Neocallimastix frontalis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yutaka Nakashimada
    • 1
  • Karthikeyan Srinivasan
    • 1
    • 1
  • Makoto Murakami
    • 1
    • 1
  • Naomichi Nishio
    • 1
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of MatterHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan

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