Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 30, Issue 6, pp 595–598 | Cite as

Benefit—Cost Analysis and Autism Services: A Response to Jacobson and Mulick

  • Lee M. Marcus
  • Julie S. Rubin
  • Marc A. Rubin
Commentary

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REFERENCES

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee M. Marcus
    • 1
  • Julie S. Rubin
    • 2
  • Marc A. Rubin
    • 2
  1. 1.Division TEACCH, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of North Carolina School of MedicineChapel Hill
  2. 2.Miami UniversityOxford

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