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Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 149–174 | Cite as

Adult Attachment Style and Cognitive Reactions to Positive Affect: A Test of Mental Categorization and Creative Problem Solving

  • Mario Mikulincer
  • Elka Sheffi
Article

Abstract

Three studies examined the moderating effect of attachment style on cognitive reactions to positive affect inductions. In Study 1 (N = 110), participants completed attachment style scales, were asked to retrieve a happy or a neutral memory, and, then, performed a categorization task. Study 2 (N = 120) used the same affect induction, while examining creative problem solving in the Remote Associates Test. Study 3 (N = 120) replicated Study 2, while using another affect induction (watching a comedy film) and controlling for trait anxiety scores. Overall, securely attached persons reacted to positive affect with broader categorization and better performance in creative problem-solving tasks. Anxious–ambivalent persons showed an opposite pattern of cognitive reactions to positive affect, and avoidant persons showed no difference in their cognitive reactions to positive and neutral affect inductions. The discussion emphasizes the role that attachment-related strategies of affect regulation may play in episodes of positive affect.

Keywords

Positive Affect Trait Anxiety Attachment Style Anxiety Score Adult Attachment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mario Mikulincer
    • 1
  • Elka Sheffi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBar-Ilan UniversityRamat GanIsrael
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBar-Ilan UniversityRamat GanIsrael

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