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Sexuality and Disability

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 125–135 | Cite as

Sexuality and Adolescents with Autism

  • Rebecca Koller
Article

Abstract

Appropriate education in sexuality is critical to the development of a person's positive self-esteem. The development of a healthy self-image may overcome potential feelings of depression and loneliness for the person with autism. This paper addresses the need for and challenges to providing sexuality education to individuals with autism. It summarizes teaching methods and approaches which have proven to be successful with this population.

sexuality education adolescence self-pleasuring sexual abuse 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca Koller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of UtahSalt Lake City

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