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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 1941–1952 | Cite as

Laboratory and Field Study of the Attraction of Male Pea Midges, Contarinia pisi, to Synthetic Sex Pheromone Components

  • Ylva Hillbur
  • Ashraf El-Sayed
  • Marie Bengtsson
  • Jan Löfqvist
  • Anthony Biddle
  • Ernst Plass
  • Wittko Francke
Article

Abstract

Behavioral activity of the recently identified sex pheromone components of the pea midge, Contarinia pisi, (2S,11S)-diacetoxytridecane, (2S,12S)-diacetoxytridecane, and 2-acetoxytridecane, was tested in wind tunnel and field-trapping experiments. In the wind tunnel, the attractancy of the three-component blend in a 7 : 10 : 0.1 ratio (following the above order, mimicking the ratios found in gland extract) did not differ significantly from female gland extract, whereas a mixture of the two major components (7 : 10) only attracted 2% of the males to the source. In the field, traps baited with the three-component blend caught by far the largest number of males. Traps baited with the two major components only caught slightly more than the blank traps, and catches in traps baited with 2-acetoxytridecane alone did not differ from catches in the blank traps. Traps baited with the racemate of all three components did not catch more than the blank traps, indicating that some of the enantiomers are inhibitory.

Contarinia pisi Cecidomyiidae Diptera sex pheromone (2S 11S)-diacetoxytridecane (2S 12S)-diacetoxytridecane 2-acetoxytridecane wind tunnel field trapping 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ylva Hillbur
    • 1
  • Ashraf El-Sayed
    • 2
  • Marie Bengtsson
    • 2
  • Jan Löfqvist
    • 2
  • Anthony Biddle
    • 3
  • Ernst Plass
    • 4
  • Wittko Francke
    • 4
  1. 1.Swedish University of Agricultural SciencesAlnarpSweden
  2. 2.Department of Plant Protection SciencesSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesAlnarpSweden
  3. 3.Processors and Growers Reserach Organisation, ThornhaughPeterboroughUK
  4. 4.Institute of Organic ChemistryUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany

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