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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 1983–1990 | Cite as

Sex Pheromone Components of Nettle Caterpillar, Setora nitens

  • Yorianta Sasaerila
  • Regine Gries
  • Gerhard Gries
  • Grigori Khaskin
  • Hardi
Article

Abstract

Gas chromatographic–electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) analyses of pheromone gland extracts of female nettle caterpillars, Setora nitens, revealed four compounds that consistently elicited responses from male moth antennae. Retention indices on three fused silia columns (DB-5, DB-23, and DB-210) of two EAD-active compounds were almost identical to those of (E)-9-dodecenal (E9–12 : Ald) and (E)-9,11-dodecadienal (E9,11–12 : Ald), two pheromone components previously identified in congeneric Setothosea asigna. However, comparative GC, GC-EAD, and GC-mass spectrometry of extracted S. nitens compounds and authentic standards revealed that the candidate pheromone components were (Z)-9-dodecenal (Z9–12 : Ald) and (Z)-9,11-dodecadienal (Z9,11–12 : Ald). The two other EAD-active compounds in pheromone gland extracts proved to be the corresponding alcohols to these aldehydes. In field-trapping experiments in Tawau, Malaysia, synthetic Z9–12 : Ald and Z9,11–12 : Ald at a 1 : 1 ratio, but not singly, attracted male S. nitens. Attractiveness of these two aldehydes could not be enhanced through the addition of their corresponding alcohols. Whether these differences in pheromone biology and chemistry between S. nitens and S. asigna are sufficient to prevent cross-attraction of heterospecific males or whether nonpheromonal mechanisms are required to maintain reproductive isolation is currently being studied.

Setora nitens Setothosea asigna nettle caterpillar Limacodidae Lepidoptera sex pheromone (Z)-9-dodecenal (Z)-9,11-dodecadienal (E)-9-dodecenal (E)-9,11-dodecadienal oil palm Elaeis guineensis 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yorianta Sasaerila
    • 1
  • Regine Gries
    • 1
  • Gerhard Gries
    • 2
  • Grigori Khaskin
    • 1
  • Hardi
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Environmental Biology, Department of Biological SciencesSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Centre for Environmental Biology, Department of Biological SciencesSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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