Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 415–420 | Cite as

Characterization and biobleaching effect of hemicellulases produced by thermophilic fungi

  • J. Haarhoff
  • C.J. Moes
  • C. Cerff
  • W.J. van Wyk
  • G. Gerischer
  • B.J.H. Janse
Article
  • 45 Downloads

Abstract

The culture supernatant of Thermomyces lanuginosus strains MED 2D and MED 4B1 had high activities of xylanase with low inducible activities of β-xylosidase. The crude xylanase was optimally active at 70 °C and at pH 6.0 to 6.5. Subsequently Eucalyptus kraft pulp was treated with MED 2D supernatant at 10 IU per gram pulp resulting in a 10.5% reduction in Kappa number. XECEDED-Refined bleached pulp resulted in handsheets with increased brightness compared to the control (X = xylanase treatment; E = alkaline extraction; C = Cl2 treatment; D = ClO2 treatment).

biobleaching hemicellulases Thermomyces lanuginosus thermophiles 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Haarhoff
    • 1
  • C.J. Moes
    • 1
  • C. Cerff
    • 1
  • W.J. van Wyk
    • 1
  • G. Gerischer
    • 1
  • B.J.H. Janse
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of StellenboschStellenboschSouth Africa
  2. 2.Mondi ForestsHilton South Africa

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