Counselling clients with acquired hearing impairment: towards improved understanding and communication

  • M. Robertson
Article

Abstract

This article seeks to bring to the attention of counsellors and counselling psychologists specific knowledge and awareness in working with clients with adult onset hearing loss. The need for improved awareness of the needs of these clients is argued, the experience of hearing loss explored, and psychological issues at the core of the disability discussed. Practical matters about communication that need consideration in the counselling setting are examined. It is presented from the vantage point of an experienced counselling psychologist who is herself hearing impaired.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Robertson
    • 1
  1. 1.ParkvilleAustralia

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