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Solar Physics

, Volume 190, Issue 1–2, pp 409–418 | Cite as

What is Moss?

  • T.E. Berger
  • B. De Pontieu
  • L. Fletcher
  • C.J. Schrijver
  • T.D. Tarbell
  • A.M. Title
Article

Abstract

TRACE observations of active regions show a peculiar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission over certain plage areas. Termed `moss' for its spongy, low-lying, appearance, observations and modeling imply that the phenomenon is caused by thermal conduction from 3–5 MKcoronal loops overlying the plage: moss is the upper transition region emission of hot coronal loops. The spongy appearance is due to the presence of chromospheric jets or `spicules' interspersed with the EUV emission elements. High cadence TRACE observations show that the moss EUV elements interact with the chromospheric jets on 10 s time scales. The location of EUV emission in the moss does not correlate well to the locations of underlying magnetic elements in the chromosphere and photosphere, implying a complex magnetic topology for coronal loop footpoint regions. We summarize here the key observations leading to these conclusions and discuss new implications for understanding the structuring of the outer solar atmosphere.

Keywords

Solar Atmosphere Coronal Loop Region Emission Magnetic Element Extreme Ultraviolet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • T.E. Berger
    • 1
  • B. De Pontieu
    • 1
  • L. Fletcher
    • 1
  • C.J. Schrijver
    • 1
  • T.D. Tarbell
    • 1
  • A.M. Title
    • 1
  1. 1.Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics LaboratoryPalo AltoU.S.A

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