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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 223–232 | Cite as

Smallholder Farming of the Greater Cane Rat, Thryonomys swinderianus, Temminck, in Southern Ghana: A Baseline Survey of Management Practices

  • E.K. Adu
  • W.S. Alhassan
  • F.S. Nelson
Article

Abstract

Baseline management practices and productivity of captive greater cane rats were studied between February and July 1992 using questionnaires with 33 practising and former farmers in 16 villages in three regions in southern Ghana. The colony sizes were relatively small, ranging between 1 and 96, with nearly a 100% farmer drop-out rate. The mean litter size of the greater cane rats in this study was 4.8±0.13, with the young being weaned at 8.8 weeks old. Although nearly all the farmers interviewed (90.9%) had long-term commercial intentions, a number of problems militating against their objectives were encountered. These included lack of technical support on proper management practices for efficient production, housing design, dry season feeding, sex determination and the acquisition of foundation stock. In conclusion, these studies have shown the generally poor state of the greater cane rat industry in Ghana, which requires research into almost all aspects of the productivity of this animal under captive breeding.

Greater cane rat food litter size reproduction sexual differences water Thryonomys swinderianus 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • E.K. Adu
    • 1
  • W.S. Alhassan
    • 1
  • F.S. Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Animal Research Institute, CSIRAchimotaGhana

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