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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 71–83 | Cite as

Projective Identification: A Request for Relationship

  • David Braucher
Article

Abstract

Projective identification is commonly recognized as a primitive defense. In group work with ego-impaired preadolescent boys with significant environmental deficits, projective identification is used to communicate a need for a relationship previously unavailable to them. These boys project unwanted aspects of themselves in order to have them contained by the therapist. They induce feelings in the therapist in order to share their internal experience. As the feelings are modified by the therapist and reintrojected by the boys, the boys receive the parenting they missed and are able to form more stable attachments.

group boys projective identification Bion aggression 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Braucher

There are no affiliations available

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