Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 299–303 | Cite as

Velogenic Newcastle Disease Virus in Captive Wild Birds

  • P. Roy
  • A.T. Venugopalan
  • R. Selvarangam
  • V. Ramaswamy
Article

Abstract

Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was isolated from the faeces of seven different species of clinically healthy captive wild birds. All seven NDV isolates were characterized as velogenic, based on the mean death time in embryonated hens' eggs and the intracerebral pathogenicity index in day-old chicks. Three of the isolates were placed in group C1 based on the reactions with monoclonal antibodies. The role of captive wild birds in the epidemiology of Newcastle disease is briefly discussed.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Roy
    • 1
  • A.T. Venugopalan
    • 1
  • R. Selvarangam
    • 2
  • V. Ramaswamy
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Animal Health Studies, Tamil Nadu Veterinary andAnimal Sciences University, Madhavaram Milk ColonyChennaiIndia;
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Texas Medical SchoolGalvestonUSA

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