Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 72, Issue 1, pp 63–77

The Mentally Ill in Jails and Prisons: Towards an Integrated Model of Prevention

  • J. Steven Lamberti
  • Robert L. Weisman
  • Steven B. Schwarzkopf
  • Nancy Price
  • Rudo Mundondo Ashton
  • John Trompeter
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1004862104102

Cite this article as:
Lamberti, J.S., Weisman, R.L., Schwarzkopf, S.B. et al. Psychiatr Q (2001) 72: 63. doi:10.1023/A:1004862104102

Abstract

Jails and prisons have become a final destination for persons with severe mental illness in America. Addiction, homelessness, and fragmentation of services have contributed to the problem, and have underscored the need for new models of service delivery. Project Link is a university-led consortium of five community agencies in Monroe County, New York that spans healthcare, social service and criminal justice systems. The program features a mobile treatment team with a forensic psychiatrist, a dual diagnosis treatment residence, and culturally competent staff. This paper discusses the importance of service integration in preventing jail and hospital recidivism, and describes steps that Project Link has taken towards integrating healthcare, criminal justice, and social services. Results from a preliminary evaluation suggest that Project Link may be effective in reducing recidivism and in improving community adjustment among severely mentally ill patients with histories of arrest and incarceration.

schizophrenia addiction incarceration integration prevention 

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Steven Lamberti
    • 1
  • Robert L. Weisman
    • 1
  • Steven B. Schwarzkopf
    • 1
  • Nancy Price
    • 1
  • Rudo Mundondo Ashton
    • 1
  • John Trompeter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryUSA

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