Plant and Soil

, Volume 224, Issue 2, pp 171–183

Phenotypic characteristics of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from Acacia spp. grown in Libya

  • S. H. Mohamed
  • A. Smouni
  • M. Neyra
  • D. Kharchaf
  • A. Filali-Maltouf
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1004838218642

Cite this article as:
Mohamed, S.H., Smouni, A., Neyra, M. et al. Plant and Soil (2000) 224: 171. doi:10.1023/A:1004838218642

Abstract

Thirty isolates of root-nodulating bacteria obtained from Acacia cyanophylla, A. karroo, A. cyclops, A. tortilis (subsp.raddiana), Faidherbia albida and Acacia sp., grown in different regions of Libya, were studied by performing numerical analysis of 104 characteristics. Three fast- and one slow-growing reference strains from herbaceous and woody legumes were included. Five distinct clusters were formed. The fast-growing reference strains were separated from the isolates whereas the slow-growing was included in cluster 4. With the exception of one cluster, the majority of clusters were formed regardless of the host plant or site of origin. Based on plant tests, generation times, acid production and carbon utilization the isolates were diverse (fast and slow-growing isolates). Like slow-growing isolates, most of the fast-growing isolates appeared to be non-specific, nodulated many species from the same genus notably F. albida, known to nodulate only with slow-growing strains. Most clusters grew at temperatures 35 °C and 37 °C; some grew at temperatures above 40 °C. The majority of isolates grew at acid and alkaline pH and only one isolate grew below pH 4. Most isolates were able to utilize many amino acids as nitrogen sources and to reduce nitrate. Urea was hydrolysed by all clusters. Monosaccharides and polyols were used by slow and fast-growing isolates as the only carbon sources whereas assimilation of disaccharides varied: Some isolates, like slow-growing isolates, failed to utilize these carbon sources. Most isolates were unable to utilize polysaccharides. Regarding tolerance to NaCl on agar medium, the majority of isolates were unable to grow at a concentration of 2% NaCl, but some were highly resistant and there was one isolate which grew at 8% NaCl. Most isolates were resistant to heavy metals and to antibiotics.

Acacia Libya root-nodulating bacteria salinity temperature 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. H. Mohamed
  • A. Smouni
  • M. Neyra
  • D. Kharchaf
  • A. Filali-Maltouf

There are no affiliations available

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