Advertisement

Plant and Soil

, Volume 215, Issue 2, pp 193–202 | Cite as

Physiological responses of wheat genotypes grown in chelator-buffered nutrient solutions with increasing concentrations of excess HEDTA

  • Z. Rengel
Article

Abstract

The chelator-buffered nutrient solutions containing excess chelator have been used frequently in the micronutrient research, but potential toxicity of the excess chelator has not been ascertained. The present study was conducted to test effects of four concentrations of excess HEDTA [ N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenedinitrilotriacetic acid] and two levels of total Zn on growth, root exudation, and nutrient uptake and transport by Triticum aestivum L. (cv. Aroona) and Triticum turgidum L. conv. durum (Desf.) MacKey (cv. Durati) genotypes differing in tolerance to Zn deficiency. Excess HEDTA at 50 μM reduced root and shoot growth and caused visual toxicity symptoms (necrotic lesions) on leaves; these effects were generally absent at lower concentrations of excess HEDTA. Root exudation of phytosiderophores increased with increasing concentrations of excess HEDTA at deficient and sufficient Zn levels, and was higher in Zn-deficiency-tolerant Aroona than in Zn-deficiency-sensitive Durati wheat. Shoot and root Zn concentrations showed a saturable response to increasing Zn2+ activities in solution. Excess HEDTA at 50 μM caused an increase in shoot concentrations of Fe and a decrease in concentrations of Mn and Cu. An average rate of Zn uptake increased with an increase in Zn2+ ionic activity in solution, with Zn-deficiency-tolerant Aroona having a higher rate of Zn uptake than Zn-deficiency-sensitive Durati in the deficiency range of Zn2+ activities. Average uptake rates of Mn and Cu decreased with an increase in concentration of excess HEDTA. Similar observations were noted for transport of Mn and Cu to shoots, while Zn transport to shoots was proportional to Zn2+ activities in solution. It was concluded that excess HEDTA at 50 μM adversely affects wheat growth and physiology, while excess of 25 μM or less does not cause measurable toxicity.

chelator genotypic differences HEDTA ion speciation micronutrient tolerance to zinc deficiency wheat zinc 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bell P F, Chaney R L and Angle J S 1991 Free metal activity and total metal concentrations as indices of micronutrient availability to barley [Hordeum vulgare (L.) 'Klages']. Plant Soil 130, 51-62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cakmak I, Gülüt K Y, Marschner H and Graham R D 1994 Effect of zinc and iron deficiency on phytosiderophore release in wheat genotypes differing in zinc efficiency. J. Plant Nutr. 17, 1-17.Google Scholar
  3. Cakmak I, Sari N, Marschner H, Ekiz H, Kalayci M, Yilmaz A and Braun H J 1996 Phytosiderophore release in bread and durum wheat genotypes differing in zinc efficiency. Plant Soil 180, 183-189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chaney R L, Bell P F and Coulombe B A 1989 Screening strategies for improved nutrient uptake and utilization by plants. HortSci. 24, 565-572.Google Scholar
  5. Gries D, Brunn S, Crowley D E and Parker D R 1995 Phytosiderophore production in relation to micronutrient metal defi-ciencies in barley. Plant Soil 172, 299-308.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Huang C, Webb M J and Graham R D 1994 Manganese efficiency is expressed in barley growing in soil system but not in a solution culture. J. Plant Nutr. 17, 83-95.Google Scholar
  7. Kiyosawa K 1992 Toxicities of pH buffer solutions to Chara internodal cells. Jpn. J. Phycol. 40, 215-227.Google Scholar
  8. Kochian L V 1991 Mechanisms of micronutrient uptake and translocation in plants. In Micronutrients in Agriculture, 2nd ed. Eds J J Mortvedt, F R Fox, LM Shuman and R M Welch. pp. 229-296. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WI, USA.Google Scholar
  9. Laurie S H, Tancock N P, McGrath S P and Sanders J R 1991 Influence of complexation on the uptake by plants of iron, manganese, copper and zinc. I. Effect of DTPA in a multi-metal and computer simulation study. J. Exp. Bot. 42, 509-513.Google Scholar
  10. Mori S, Nishizawa N, Kawai S, Sato Y and Takagi S 1987 Dynamic state of mugineic acid and analogous phytosiderophores in Fedeficient barley. J. Plant Nutr. 10, 1003-1011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. McLaughlin M J, Smolders E, Merckx R and Maes A 1997 Plant uptake of Cd and Zn in chelator-buffered nutrient solution depends on ligand type. In Plant Nutrition-For Sustainable Food Production and Environment. Eds T Ando et al. pp. 113-118. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  12. Norvell W A 1991 Reactions of metal chelates in soils and nutrient solutions. In Micronutrients in Agriculture, 2nd ed. Eds J J Mortvedt, F R Fox, L M Shuman and R M Welch. pp. 187-227. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WI, USA.Google Scholar
  13. Norvell W A, Dabkovski-Naskret H and Cary E E 1987 Effect of phosphorus and zinc fertilization on the solubility of Zn2C in two alkaline soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 51, 544-548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Norvell W A and Welch R M 1993 Growth and nutrient uptake by barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Herta): Studies using an N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenedinitrilotriacetic acid-buffered nutrient solution technique. I. Zinc ion requirements. Plant Physiol. 101, 619-625.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Parker D R 1993 Novel nutrient solutions for zinc nutrition research: buffering free zinc2C with synthetic chelators and P with hydroxyapatite. Plant Soil 155/156, 461-464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Parker D R 1997 Responses of six crop species to solution zinc2C activities buffered with HEDTA. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 61, 167-176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Parker D R, Aguilera J J and Thomason D N 1992 Zinc-phosphorus interactions in two cultivars of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) grown in chelator-buffered nutrient solutions. Plant Soil 143, 163-177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Parker D R and Pedler J F 1997 Reevaluating the free-ion activity model of trace element availability to higher plants. Plant Soil 196, 223-228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Parker D R, Chaney R L and Norvell W A 1995a Chemical equilibrium models: Applications to plant nutrition research. In Chemical Equilibrium and Reaction Models. Eds R H Loeppert, A P Schwab and S Goldberg. pp. 163-200. SSSA, Madison, WI, USA.Google Scholar
  20. Parker D R, Norvell W A and Chaney R L 1995b GEOCHEM-PC-A chemical speciation program for IBM and compatible personal computers. In Chemical Equilibrium and Reaction Models. Eds R H Loeppert, A P Schwab and S Goldberg. pp. 253-269. SSSA, Madison, WI, USA.Google Scholar
  21. Rengel Z 1995a Carbonic anhydrase activity in leaves of wheat genotypes differing in Zn efficiency. J. Plant Physiol. 147, 251-256.Google Scholar
  22. Rengel Z 1995b Sulfhydryl groups in root-cell plasma membranes of wheat genotypes differing in Zn efficiency. Physiol. Plant. 95, 604-612.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Rengel Z and Graham R D 1995a Wheat genotypes differ in Zn efficiency when grown in chelate-buffered nutrient solution. I. Growth. Plant Soil 176, 307-316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Rengel Z and Graham R D 1995b Wheat genotypes differ in Zn efficiency when grown in chelate-buffered nutrient solution. II. Nutrient uptake. Plant Soil 176, 317-324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Rengel Z and Graham R D 1996 Uptake of zinc from chelatebuffered nutrient solutions by wheat genotypes differing in Zn efficiency. J. Exp. Bot. 47, 217-226.Google Scholar
  26. Rengel Z, Graham R D and Pedler J F 1994 Time-course of biosynthesis of phenolics and lignin in roots of wheat genotypes differing in manganese efficiency and resistance to take-all fungus. Ann. Bot. 74, 471-477.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Rengel Z, Römheld V and Marschner H 1998 Uptake of zinc and iron by wheat genotypes differing in zinc efficiency. J. Plant Physiol. 152, 433-438.Google Scholar
  28. Römheld V and Marschner H 1981 Effect of Fe stress on utilization of Fe chelates by efficient and inefficient plant species. J. Plant Nutr. 3, 1-4.Google Scholar
  29. Walter A, Römheld V, Marschner H and Mori S 1994 Is the release of phytosiderophores in zinc-deficient wheat plants a response to impaired iron utilization? Physiol. Plant. 92, 493-500.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Webb M J, Norvell WA, Welch R Mand Graham R D 1993 Using a chelate-buffered nutrient solution to establish the critical solution activity of Mn2C required by barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Plant and Soil 153, 195-205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Yang X, Römheld V and Marschner H 1994 Application of chelatorbuffered nutrient solution technique in studies on zinc nutrition in rice plant (Oryza sativa L.). Plant Soil 163, 85-94.Google Scholar
  32. Youatt J 1994 The toxicity of metal chelate complexes of EGTA precludes the use of EGTA buffered media for the fungi Allomyces and Achlya. Microbios 79, 171-185.Google Scholar
  33. Zhang F S 1993 Mobilisation of iron and manganese by plant-borne and synthetic metal chelators. In Plant Nutrition-From Genetic Engineering to Field Practice. Ed. N J Barrow. pp. 115-118. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. Rengel
    • 1
  1. 1.Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of AgricultureThe University of Western AustraliaNedlandsAustralia

Personalised recommendations