Plant and Soil

, Volume 202, Issue 1, pp 33–39 | Cite as

Effect of iron plaque outside roots on nutrient uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.). Zinc uptake by Fe-deficient rice

  • Xike Zhang
  • Fusuo Zhang
  • Daru Mao
Article

Abstract

This solution culture study examined the effect of the deposition of iron plaque on zinc uptake by Fe-deficient rice plants. Different amounts of iron plaque were induced by adding Fe(OH)3 at 0, 10, 20, 30, and 50 mg Fe/L in the nutrient solution. After 24 h of growth, the amount of iron plaque was correlated positively with the Fe(OH)3 addition to the nutrient solution. Increasing iron plaque up to 12.1 g/kg root dry weight increased zinc concentration in shoots by 42% compared to that at 0.16 g/kg root dry weight. Increasing the amount of iron plaque further decreased zinc concentration. When the amounts of iron plaque reached 24.9 g/kg root dry weight, zinc concentration in shoots was lower than that in shoots without iron plaque, implying that the plaque became a barrier for zinc uptake. While rice plants were pre-cultured in −Fe and +Fe nutrient solution in order to produce the Fe-deficient and Fe-sufficient plants and then Fe(OH)3 was added at 20, 30, and 50 mg Fe/L in nutrient solution, zinc concentrations in shoots of Fe-deficient plants were 54, 48, and 43 mg/kg, respectively, in contrast to 32, 35, and 40 mg/kg zinc in shoots of Fe-sufficient rice plants. Furthermore, Fe(OH)3 addition at 20 mg Fe/L and increasing zinc concentration from 0.065 to 0.65 mg Zn/L in nutrient solution increased zinc uptake more in Fe-deficient plants than in Fe-sufficient plant. The results suggested that root exudates of Fe-deficient plants, especially phytosiderophores, could enhance zinc uptake by rice plants with iron plaque up to a particular amount of Fe.

iron plaque phytosiderophore rice (Oryza sativa L.) zinc uptake 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xike Zhang
    • 1
  • Fusuo Zhang
    • 2
  • Daru Mao
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Resource and Environment Science, Faculty of AgricultureAgricultural University of HebeiBaodingChina
  2. 2.Department of Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Resource and EnvironmentChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina

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