Philosophical Studies

, Volume 94, Issue 3, pp 237–251

The Language of Thought and The Embodied Nature of Language Use

  • Norman Yujen Teng
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Yujen Teng
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PhilosophyNational Chung Cheng UniversityChia-YiTaiwan

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