The Histochemical Journal

, Volume 32, Issue 9, pp 557–564 | Cite as

Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase-positive Neuronal Cell Bodies and Terminals in the Human Cerebellar Cortex

  • Vincenzo Benagiano
  • Daniela Virgintino
  • Anna Rizzi
  • Paolo Flace
  • Vito Troccoli
  • Joachim Bormann
  • Paul Monaghan
  • David Robertson
  • Luisa Roncali
  • Glauco Ambrosi
Article

Abstract

The distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the human cerebellar cortex was studied using immunohistochemistry for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme that catalyses GABA synthesis. Observations by light microscopy revealed, in all layers of the cerebellar cortex, strong, punctate positivity for GAD, related to putative GABAergic nerve terminals, as well as a diffuse cytoplasmic immunoreactivity within neuronal cell bodies. GAD-positive nerve terminals were found in close relationship with the walls of the cerebellar cortex microvessels. Observations by electron microscopy revealed positive nerve terminals in contact with the astrocyte perivascular sheath of capillaries. GAD immunoreactivity was also detected within astroglial perivascular endfeet and endothelial cells. The findings provide further insights into the GABAergic synapses of the circuitry of the human cerebellar cortex. The detection of ‘vascular’ GAD immunoreactivities suggests that GABAergic mechanisms may regulate cerebellar microvessel function.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincenzo Benagiano
    • 1
  • Daniela Virgintino
    • 1
  • Anna Rizzi
    • 1
  • Paolo Flace
    • 1
  • Vito Troccoli
    • 2
  • Joachim Bormann
    • 3
  • Paul Monaghan
    • 4
  • David Robertson
    • 5
  • Luisa Roncali
    • 1
  • Glauco Ambrosi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human Anatomy and HistologyUniversity of Bari PoliclinicoBariItaly
  2. 2.Cattedra di NeurochirurgiaUniversity of BariItaly
  3. 3.Lehrstuhl für ZellphysiologieRuhr-UniversitätBochumGermany
  4. 4.Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, SurreyUK
  5. 5.Haddow LaboratoriesInstitute of Cancer ResearchSuttonUK

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