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The Histochemical Journal

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 139–150 | Cite as

Levels, Phosphorylation Status and Cellular Localization of Translational Factor EIF2 in Gastrointestinal Carcinomas

  • María V.T. Lobo
  • M. Elena Martín
  • M. Isabel Pérez
  • F. Javier M. Alonso
  • Clara Redondo
  • M. Isabel Álvarez
  • Matilde Salinas
Article

Abstract

The level of expression and the phosphorylation status of the α subunit of initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) protein have been determined by comparing samples from human stomach, colon and sigma-rectum carcinomas with normal tissue from the same patients. The unphosphorylated and phosphorylated levels of cytoplasmic eIF2α, as well as the percentage of phosphorylated factor over the total, were significantly higher in stomach, colon and sigma-rectum tumours compared with normal tissue. The expression of this factor was also studied by using immunocytochemical methods, where redistribution towards the nucleus in tumour cells as compared with normal tissue was observed. Our results support a likely implication of eIF2α in gastrointestinal cancer.

Keywords

Carcinoma Tumour Cell Normal Tissue Human Stomach Cellular Localization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • María V.T. Lobo
    • 1
  • M. Elena Martín
    • 2
  • M. Isabel Pérez
    • 1
  • F. Javier M. Alonso
    • 1
  • Clara Redondo
    • 3
  • M. Isabel Álvarez
    • 3
  • Matilde Salinas
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de InvestigaciónHospital Ramón y CajalMadridSpain
  2. 2.Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología MolecularUniversidad de Alcalá, Alcalá de HenaresMadridSpain
  3. 3.Servicio de Anatomía PatológicaHospital Ramón y CajalMadridSpain

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