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Euphytica

, Volume 98, Issue 3, pp 149–154 | Cite as

RAPD markers linked to a clubroot-resistance locus in Brassica rapa L.

  • Yasuhisa Kuginuki
  • Hidetoshi Ajisaka
  • Mamiko Yui
  • Hiroaki Yoshikawa
  • Ken-ichi Hida
  • Masashi Hirai
Article

Abstract

Linkage of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers with resistance genes to clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Wor.) in Brassica rapa L. was studied in a doubled haploid (DH population obtained by microspore culture. Thirty-six DH lines were obtained from F1 plants from a cross between susceptible ‘Homei P09’ and resistant ‘Siloga S2’ plants. ‘Homei P09’ was a DH line obtained by microspore culture of the Chinese cabbage variety ‘Homei’, which is highly responsive in microspore culture. The resistant line ‘Siloga S2’ was obtained by two rounds of selfing of the fodder turnip ‘Siloga’. Three RAPD markers, RA12-75A, WE22B and WE49B, were found to be linked to a clubroot-resistance locus. These three markers were linked in the DH lines and an F2 population and should be useful for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs.

Chinese cabbage doubled haploid microspore culture Plasmodiophora brassicae Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuhisa Kuginuki
    • 1
  • Hidetoshi Ajisaka
    • 1
  • Mamiko Yui
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • Ken-ichi Hida
    • 1
  • Masashi Hirai
    • 1
  1. 1.Ornamental Plants and Tea (NIVOT)National Research Institute of VegetablesAno, MieJapan

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