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Euphytica

, Volume 97, Issue 2, pp 227–233 | Cite as

Powdery mildew resistance in barley landrace material. I. Screening for resistance

  • J. Helms Jørgensen
  • H.P. Jensen
Article

Abstract

A total of 4,681 accessions of Hordeum vulgare landrace material from Ethiopia, East Mediterranean, Near East, Nepal and China were sown in the field and subjected to the natural powdery mildew epidemic in Denmark. Apparently resistant accessions were selected. Selfed progeny from them were retested and reselected in subsequent years at four locations in Denmark. Finally, 16 promising donors of resistance were retained. They were characterized in the field and tested in the seedling stage for reaction to up to 72 different isolates of the powdery mildew fungus. The absence of the corresponding virulences in the Danish airborne powdery mildew population was ascertained in five years. The resistances in the 16 donors are apparently mutually different and from known sources of powdery mildew resistance in barley.

Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei genetic resources Hordeum vulgare recurrent selection resistance virulence 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Helms Jørgensen
    • 1
  • H.P. Jensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Risø National LaboratoryPlant Genetics Environmental Science and Technology DepartmentRoskildeDenmark

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