Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 78, Issue 1, pp 43–49 | Cite as

Hyperproduction of polyesters consisting of medium-chain-length hydroxyalkanoate monomers by strain Pseudomonas stutzeri 1317

  • Jianzhong Xi
  • Qiong Wu
  • Yongbin Yan
  • Zengming Zhang
  • Peter H.F. Yu
  • Man-ken Cheung
  • Riqing Zhang
  • Guo-Qiang Chen
Article

Abstract

Pseudomonas stutzeri strain 1317 was found to grow on various fatty acids, alcohols, diols, as well as glucose and gluconate for the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) with various monomer units. The PHA monomer structures were dependent on the type of fatty acids and alcohols, as well as the diols in the culture media. Only even number monomers, such as 3-hydroxyhexanoate (HHx), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (HO) and 3-hydroxydecanoate (HD), were accumulated when even numbered fatty acids, alcohols, glucose and gluconate, as well as diol were used as carbon sources. Odd numbered fatty acids and odd numbered alcohols led to the formation of odd numbered monomers, such as 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV), 3-hydroxyheptanoate (HHp), 3-hydroxynonanoate (HN) and 3-hydroxyundecanoate (HU). The strain tolerated up to 1.5% of ethanol and made 8.3% of PHA when growth was conducted in 1.2% of ethanol. PHA formed up to 77% of cell dry weight when the strain was grown in tridecanoate. PHA synthesis was highly dependent on the nitrogen source. A depletion in nitrogen supply immediately resulted in PHA accumulation in cells grown in the glucose mineral medium.

Polyhydroxyalkanoate Pseudomonas stutzeri 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianzhong Xi
    • 1
  • Qiong Wu
    • 1
  • Yongbin Yan
    • 2
  • Zengming Zhang
    • 3
  • Peter H.F. Yu
    • 4
  • Man-ken Cheung
    • 4
  • Riqing Zhang
    • 2
  • Guo-Qiang Chen
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Biological Sciences and BiotechnologyTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory for Biomembrane and Membrane BiotechnologyTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina
  3. 3.Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua UniversityBeijingChina
  4. 4.Open Laboratory for Chiral TechnologyHong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong Kong
  5. 5.Department of Biological Sciences and BiotechnologyTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina

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