Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 123–152 | Cite as

Archaeological Data Models and Web Publication Using XML

  • J. David Schloen
Article

Abstract

An appropriate standardized data model is necessary tofacilitate electronic publication and analysis ofarchaeological data on the World Wide Web. Ahierarchical ``item-based'' model is proposed which canbe readily implemented as an Extensible MarkupLanguage (XML) tagging scheme that can represent anykind of archaeological data and deliver it in across-platform, standardized fashion to any Webbrowser. This tagging scheme and the data model itimplements permit seamless integration and jointquerying of archaeological datasets derived from manydifferent sources.

archaeology data models World Wide Web XML 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. David Schloen
    • 1
  1. 1.The Oriental Institute of the University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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