Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 71, Issue 3, pp 243–248 | Cite as

Yeasts associated with nests of the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel, 1908

  • Solange Cristina Carreiro
  • Fernando Carlos Pagnocca
  • Odair Correa Bueno
  • Mauricio Bacci Júnior
  • Maria José Aparecida Hebling
  • Osvaldo Aulino da Silva
Article

Abstract

A total of 137 yeasts associated with the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel, 1908 were characterized, being selected 93 for analysis. Twenty four species belonging to seven genera (Candida, Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces, Tremella, Trichosporon, Pichia) were isolated from the different analysed material. The genus Candida was widely distributed, with C. homilentoma, C. colliculosa-like, C. famata and C. colliculosa being the most prevalent. A few isolates did not fit the standard descriptions and probably some of them could be new biotypes or even new species. Three strains of black yeasts were also isolated, and four others were identified as being Candida spp. The effective number of yeast species was higher in newer sponge. The origin, distribution and relative importance of these microorganisms for the ants are discussed.

yeasts Atta sexdens rubropilosa leaf-cutting ants 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Solange Cristina Carreiro
    • 1
  • Fernando Carlos Pagnocca
    • 1
  • Odair Correa Bueno
    • 1
  • Mauricio Bacci Júnior
    • 1
  • Maria José Aparecida Hebling
    • 1
  • Osvaldo Aulino da Silva
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Estudos de Insetos SociaisUNESPRio Claro, Sã o PauloBrazil

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