Advertisement

Feeding, Development and Reproduction of the Predatory Mite, Hypoaspis Vacua on Various Kinds of Food Substances (Acari: Laelapidae)

  • B. A. Abou-Awad
  • A. K. Nasr
  • E. A. Gomaa
  • M. M. Abou-Elela
Research Article

Abstract

The predacious mite, Hypoaspis Vacua (Michael) successfully developed from larva to adult stage when fed on eggs of housefly, Musca domestica (L.) and nymphs of acarid mite, Rhizoglyphus echinopus (Fum. & Rob.) in the laboratory. The duration of the immature stages and of the adult stage were determined. Food type greatly affected female fecundity and feeding capacity. Immature stages of H. vacua consumed in total an average of 13.6 eggs of M. domestica and 33.0 nymphs of R. echinopus, whereas each day throughout her life, the adult female consumed an average of 4.1 eggs of M. domestica and 13.23 nymphs of R. echinopus. Eggs of housefly were the most suitable diet, as it prolonged adult longevity (76.8 days) and increased female fecundity (13 eggs/female/day).

Key Words

Biology Hypoaspis Vacua Laelapidae Acari predacious mites 

Résumé

L’acarien prédateur, Hypoaspis Vacua (Michael) s’est développé avec succès depuis la larve jusqu’au stade adulte quand il s’alimentait sur des oeufs de la mouche domestique Musca domestica (L.) et des larves de l’acarien Rhizoglyphus echinopus (Fum. et Rob.) au laboratoire. Les durées des stades non murs et adulte ont été déterminées. Le type de nourriture affectait grandement la fécondité des femelles et la capacité de prise alimentaire. Les stades pré-adultes consomment au total enmoyenne 13,6 M. domestica et 33,0 R. echinopusp par jour pendant toute leur existence, la famella adulte une moyenne de 4,1 M. domestica et 13,23 R. echinopus. Les oeufs de la mouche domestique offraient le régime alimentaire convenant le mieux puisqu’ils prolongeaient la longévité des adultes (76,8 jours) et augentaient la fécondié des femelles (1,3 oeufs/femele/jour).

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Afifi A.M. (1977) Studies on soil predacious mites. M. Sc. Thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University.Google Scholar
  2. Afifi, A. M. (1980) Occurrence of mites in different organic manures. Ph.D. Thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University.Google Scholar
  3. Axtell, R. C. (1963) Acarina occurring in domestic animal manure. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 56, 628–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Berry, R. E. (1973) Biology of predacious mite Perga-masus qidsquiliarum on the garden symphylen Scutigrella imaculata in the laboratory. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 66, 1354–1356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bhattacharyya, S. L. (1962) Laboratory studies on the feeding habits and life cycle of soil inhabiting mites. Pedobiologia 1, 291–298.Google Scholar
  6. Chi, H. (1981) The reproduction rate of Hypoaspis aculeifer (Acarina: Laelapidae) fed with Onychiurusfimatus (Collembola, Onychiuridae) at various temperature. Entomologie 113, 122–125.Google Scholar
  7. ElBishlawy, S. M.O. (1978) Ecological and biological studies on mites associated with weeds, with special reference to lawn grasses. Ph. D. Thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University.Google Scholar
  8. Hunter, B. E. (1964) Observation on the biology of Laelaspis vitzthum (Acarina: Laelapidae). J. Kansas Entomol. Soc. 37, 289–292.Google Scholar
  9. Loobes, P. and Schotten, C. (1980) Capacities of increase of the soil mite Hypoaspis aculeifer Canestrini (Mesostigmata: Laelapidae). Z. angew. Entomol. 90, 9–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Metwally, A. M., Abou El-Naga, M. M. and Ibrahim, G. A. (1983) Biological studies on Hypoaspis miles (Berlese) (Acarina: Laelapidae). Proc. 5th Arab Pesticide Conf. Tanta Univ. 4, 375.Google Scholar
  11. Mohamed, M. I. (1976) The role of soil predacious mites in biological control. Ph. D. Thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University.Google Scholar
  12. Nawar, M. S.M. (1985) Ecological and biological studies on mites inhabiting desert plants and newly reclaimed lands with special consideration to Sinai Peninsula. Ph. D. Thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University.Google Scholar
  13. Philips, S. and Baker, E. (1969) The response of a predator Hypoaspis aculeifer Canestrini (Acarina: Laelapidae) to two species of prey. Can. J. Zool. 47, 343–345.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Ragusa, S. and Zedan, M. S. (1985) Laboratory studies on development and oviposition on the predacious mite Hypoaspis aculeifer on various kinds of food substances. Entomol Palermo, 28.Google Scholar
  15. Shereef, G. M., Zaher, M. A. and Afifi, M. A. (1980) Life history of Hypoaspis bregetovae S. & A. and H. pertrovaes. & A. (Mesostigmala: Laelapidae) with their feeding habits. Proc. 1st Conf Plant Prot. Res. Ins. 3, 149–168.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ICIPE 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Abou-Awad
    • 1
  • A. K. Nasr
    • 1
  • E. A. Gomaa
    • 1
  • M. M. Abou-Elela
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Protection DepartmentNational Research CentreDokki, CairoEgypt

Personalised recommendations