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Ecology in Relation to Integrated Tick Management

  • R. J. Tatchell
Tick Ecology and Modelling

Abstract

Selected aspects of ecological interactions with ticks, tick-borne diseases and their hosts are discussed in relation to Integrated Tick Management, The needs to preserve tick-borne disease enzootic stability and to ensure the economic justification for any interventions were emphasized.

Key Words

Ecology ticks tick-borne diseases Integrated Pest Management 

Résumé

Aspects séléctés des intéractions écologiques avec les tiques, les maladies transmitté par les tiques et leurs hôtes sont discutés en relation au Management Integré des Tiques. Les bésoins de préserver la stabilité enzootique des maladies transmitté par les tiques et pour ensurer la justification économique pour tous les interventions ont emphasisé.

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Tatchell
    • 1
  1. 1.CefnbrynLampeter, DyfedUK

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