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Insect Antifeedants from Tephrosia elata Deflers

  • M. D. Bentley
  • A. Hassanali
  • W. Lwande
  • P. E. W. Njoroge
  • E. N. Ole Sitayo
  • M. Yatagai
Research Article

Abstract

Two antifeedants, isopongaflavone and tephrosin have been isolated from Tephrosia elata. Tephrosin displayed high activity against Spodoptera exempta, while isopongaflavone was shown to be very active against Maruca testulalis and Eldana saccharina. Rotenone was found to be active as an antifeedant against S. exempta, E. saccharina and M. testulalis. Insects in the orders Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera, all associated with T. elata seed pods, were identified.

Key Words

Antifeedants Tephrosia elata isopongaflavone tephrosin rotenone tetrahydroisopongaflavone 

Résumé

Deux antifondants, l’isopongaflavone et le tephrosin sont ete isoles de Tephrosia elata. Le tephrosin a montre la tres grande activité contre Spodoptera exampta, tandis que l’isopongaflavone a montre d’etre tres active contre Maruca testulalis et Eldana saccharina. On a trouve que la rotenone etait active comme un antifondant contre S. exempta, E. saccharina et M. testulalis. On a identifie que les insectes dans les groupes de Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera et Diptera sont ▵es tous associes avec les cosses des graines de T. elata.

Mots Cléfs

Antifondants Tephrosia elata isopongaflavone tephrosin rotenone tetrahydroisopongaflavone 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Bentley
    • 1
  • A. Hassanali
    • 1
  • W. Lwande
    • 1
  • P. E. W. Njoroge
    • 1
  • E. N. Ole Sitayo
    • 1
  • M. Yatagai
    • 1
  1. 1.The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)NairobiKenya

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