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Control of Dacus oleae, a Major Pest of Olives

  • T. Manousis
  • N. F. Moore
Mini-Review

Abstract

Dacus oleae (Gmelin) is a major pest of the olive tree Olea europea causing early fruit drop, ‘sting’ damage to table olives and substantial decreases in the quantity and quality of oil. This review describes the control strategies being developed and in current use—biological, trapping methods, sterile insect release, chemical insecticides, growth regulators and integrated control. Present problems and the implications of the controlling regimes on the disturbance of the agroecosystem are presented. Emphasis is given to newer methods which should be characterized by their specificity and effectivity.

Key Words

Dacus oleae control Olea europea (L.) 

Résumé

Dacus oleae (Gmelin) est un insecte principal de l’olivier qui occasionne un égrènement précoce des fruits, un endommagement des olives sous une forme de piqes, un réduction de la quantité ainsi qu’une déterioration considérable de la qualité d’huile. Cette étude decrit les stratégies de contrℓe qui sont utilisées ou en train d’▵re développées, les méthodes biologiques, de piegeage,—les insecticides, les régulateurs de croissance et le controle integré. Les problèmes actuels et les incidences des régimes de contrℓe sur l’agroecosystème sont expliqués. Un accent spécial est mis sur les nouvelles méthodes qui pourraient s’avérer plus spécifiques et plus efficaces.

Mots Cléfs

Dacus oleae controle Olea europea (L.) 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Manousis
    • 1
  • N. F. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Natural Environment Research CouncilInstitute of VirologyOxfordKenya

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