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Bruchid Control with Traditionally Used Insecticidal Plants Hyptis Spicigera and Cassia Nigricans

  • J. D. H. Lambert
  • J. Gale
  • J. T. Arnason
  • B. J. R. Philogene
Research Article

Abstract

Losses of stored seed to insects in the tropics have reached levels of major concern. Synthetic insecticides, while effective, are generally very expensive for small farmers. The efficacy of two plants, Hyptis Spicigera and Cassia Nigricans, used by farmers to control insect infestation in stored cowpeas was determined. The oviposition and hatching of bean weevils (Acanthoscelides obtectus), under controlled environmental conditions, were reduced following treatment with EtOH extracts (1 g plant material 1 ml EtOH) at low application rates with EC50 between 0.3 and 14 μl extract/g bean. Further field studies are proposed to determine if such natural products can be further exploited to reduce stored legume losses.

Key Words

Bruchid insecticidal plants Hyptis Cassia 

Résumé

Les pertes causées par les insectes aux graines entreposées ont atteint un niveau d’alerte. Les insectcides synthétiques bien qu’efficaces sont généralement très coûteux pour les petits planteurs. On a déterminé l’efficacité de deux plantes Hyptis Spicigera et Cassia Nigricans utilisées par les planteurs pour lutter contre les infestations d’insectes attaquant les pois blancs. L’oviposition et l’éclosion des charançons (Acanthoscelides objectus) à des conditions d’élevage contrôlées a été réduite suite à un traitement d’extraits alcooliques (un g/ml) à des doses faibles ayant une CE50 de 0.3–14 μl1 d’extrait par gramme de pois. Nous proposons des évaluations sur le terrain pour déterminer si l’on peut envisager l’utilisation de ce genre de produit naturel pour réduire les pertes en légumineuses emmagasinées.

Mot Cléfs

Bruchidée insecticide planteurs Hyptis Cassia 

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References

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. H. Lambert
    • 1
  • J. Gale
    • 1
  • J. T. Arnason
    • 2
  • B. J. R. Philogene
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  2. 2.tDepartment of BiologyUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

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