Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur

, Volume 56, Issue 2, pp 27–28 | Cite as

The brain effects of laser acupuncture in depressed individuals: an fMRI investigation

  • I. Quah-Smith
  • W. Wen
  • X. Chen
  • M. A. Williams
  • P. S. Sachdev
  • Petra Bäumler
Journal Club

Abstract

Background

The 2010 Cochrane Collaboration Review reported laser acupuncture as being effective in depression. The treatment was on LR 8, LR 14, CV 14, and HT 7 over 12 sessions within a 2-month period.

Objective

The aim of this study was to investigate the biological plausibility of low-intensity laser acupuncture as an antidepressant treatment.

Design

Randomized stimulation with a fiber-optic infrared laser on these acupoints and KI 3 acupoint. We used a blocked design, alternating laser and placebo laser/rest blocks, while the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI response was recorded from the whole brain on a 3T MRI scanner.

Setting

This study took place at the research institute.

Subjects

Ten subjects were studied, as confirmed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17).

Intervention

Low-intensity laser acupuncture.

Main outcome measures

Significant brain patterns for each acupoint greater than the other acupoints and placebo.

Results

Each acupoint laser stimulation condition resulted in a different activation size and pattern of neural activity.

Regions with significantly increased activation and deactivation compared to placebo included fronto-limbic-striatal brain regions. There was no significant activation or deactivation with KI 3. Blinding was afforded with the block design and the infrared laser.

Conclusions

There is positive biological evidence to support the empirical evidence for laser acupuncture in the treatment of depression. With its minimal adverse effect profile and ease of application, laser acupuncture should be included in depression management strategies.

Literatur

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Copyright information

© Springer Medizin Verlag GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Quah-Smith
    • 1
  • W. Wen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • X. Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. A. Williams
    • 4
  • P. S. Sachdev
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Petra Bäumler
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Psychiatry, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales HospitalRandwickAustralia
  3. 3.Brain & Ageing Research Program, School of PsychiatryUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  4. 4.Macquarie Centre for Cognitive SciencesMacquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  5. 5.Interdisziplinäre Schmerzambulanz, Klinik für AnaesthesiologieKlinikum der Universität MünchenMünchenDeutschland

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