Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 48–51 | Cite as

Forgotten Features of Head Zones and Their Relation to Diagnostically Relevant Acupuncture Points

  • Florian Beissner
  • Christian Henke
  • Paul U. Unschuld
  • Thomas Ots
  • David Mayor
Journal Club

Abstract

In the 1890s Sir Henry Head discovered certain areas of the skin that develop tenderness (allodynia) in the course of visceral disease. These areas were later termed ‘Headzones’. In addition, he also emphasized the existence of specific points within these zones, that he called ‘maximum points’, a finding that seems to be almost forgotten today. We hypothesized that two important groups of acupuncture points, the diagnostically relevant Mu and Shupoints, spatially and functionally coincide with these maximum points to a large extent. A comparison of Head’s papers with the Huang Di Neijing (Yellow Thearch’s Inner Classic) and the Zhen Jiu Jia Yi Jing (Systematic Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion), two of the oldest still extant Chinese sources on acupuncture, revealed astonishing parallels between the two concepts regarding both point locations and functional aspects. These findings suggest that the Chinese discovery of viscerocutaneous reflexes preceded the discovery in the West by more than 2000 years. Furthermore, the fact that Chinese medicine uses Mu- and Shu-Points not only diagnostically but also therapeutically may give us new insights into the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture.

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Copyright information

© Springer Medizin Verlag GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florian Beissner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christian Henke
    • 1
    • 3
  • Paul U. Unschuld
    • 4
  • Thomas Ots
  • David Mayor
  1. 1.Brain Imaging CenterGoethe-UniversityFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.Institute of NeuroradiologyGoethe-UniversityFrankfurtGermany
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyGoethe-UniversityFrankfurtGermany
  4. 4.Horst Goertz Institute for Theory, History and Ethics of Chinese Life SciencesCharité University MedicineBerlinGermany

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