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Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur

, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 36–37 | Cite as

Effects of preconditioning of electro-acupuncture on postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial

  • Q. Zhang
  • Y.-N. Li
  • Y.-Y. Guo
  • C.-P. Yin
  • F. Gao
  • X. Xin
  • S.-P. Huo
  • X.-L. Wang
  • Q.-J. Wang
  • P. Bosch
  • M. van den Noort
Journal Club

Abstract

Objective

Electro-acupuncture is a burgeoning treatment using the needle inserting into the body acupoints and the low-frequency pulse current being electrified by an electric acupuncture machine. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of preconditioning of electro-acupuncture on postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly.

Methods

Ninety patients scheduled spine surgery were randomly assigned into 2 groups using a random number table: control group (group C) and electro-acupuncture group (group EA). In group EA, electro-acupuncture was applied on Baihui, Dazhui, and Zusanli acupoints 30 minutes before anesthesia. At 0 minute before treatment of electro-acupuncture, 1 hour after skin incision and surgery completed (T1–3), blood samples were taken for detection of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and S100ß by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total dose of remifentanil and propofol during surgery were recorded. Mini-Mental State Examination was applied to evaluate the cognitive function of patients at 1 day before surgery and 7th and 30th day after surgery.

Results

The results showed that compared with group C, score of MMSE increased after surgery, the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, and S100ß decreased at 1 hour after skin incision, and surgery completed in group EA. Moreover, the total dose of remifentanil and propofol reduced during surgery in group EA.

Conclusions

The present study suggests that preconditioning of electro-acupuncture could improve the postoperative cognitive function, and the reduction of inflammatory reaction and brain injury may be involved in the mechanism.

Keywords

aged electro-acupuncture postoperative cognitive dysfunction 

Abbreviations

ASA

American Standards Association

BIS

bispectral index

BMI

body mass index

EA

electroacupuncture

MMSE

Mini-Mental State Examination

POCD

postoperative cognitive dysfunction

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Copyright information

© Springer Medizin Verlag GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Q. Zhang
    • 1
  • Y.-N. Li
    • 1
  • Y.-Y. Guo
    • 1
  • C.-P. Yin
    • 1
  • F. Gao
    • 1
  • X. Xin
    • 1
  • S.-P. Huo
    • 1
  • X.-L. Wang
    • 1
  • Q.-J. Wang
    • 1
  • P. Bosch
    • 2
  • M. van den Noort
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology, the Third HospitalHebei Medical UniversityShijiazhuang CityChina
  2. 2.Psychiatrische ForschungsgruppeLVR-KlinikBedburg-HauDeutschland
  3. 3.Brüssels Institut für Angewandte LinguistikFreie Universität BrüsselBrüsselBelgien

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