Traveling waves of infection in the hantavirus epidemics

  • G. Abramson
  • V. M. Kenkre
  • T. L. Yates
  • R. R. Parmenter
Article

Abstract

Traveling waves are analyzed in a model of the hantavirus infection in deer mice. The existence of two kinds of wave phenomena is predicted. An environmental parameter governs a transition between two regimes of propagation. In one of them the front of infection lags behind at a constant rate. In the other, fronts of susceptible and infected mice travel at the same speed, separated by a constant delay. The dependence of the delay on system parameters is analyzed numerically and through a piecewise linearization.

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Copyright information

© Society for Mathematical Biology 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Abramson
    • 1
    • 4
  • V. M. Kenkre
    • 1
  • T. L. Yates
    • 3
  • R. R. Parmenter
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Advanced Studies and Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biology and Museum of Southwestern BiologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  3. 3.Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research Program, Department of BiologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  4. 4.Centro Atómico Bariloche and CONICETS. C. de BarilocheArgentina

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