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Journal of Bionic Engineering

, Volume 5, Supplement 1, pp 138–142 | Cite as

Measuring the Wing Kinematics of a Moth (Helicoverpa Armigera) by a Two-Dimensional Fringe Projection Method

  • Guan-hao WuEmail author
  • Li-jiang Zeng
  • Lin-hong Ji
Article

Abstract

We describe a two-dimensional (2-D) fringe projection method, projecting two groups of comb-fringe patterns with high intensity and sharpness onto the flapping wings of a moth (Helicoverpa armigera) from two directions. The images of distorted fringes are caught by two high speed cameras from two orthogonal views. By three-dimensional reconstruction of the wing, we obtain the wing kinematics of the moth including the flapping angle, torsion angle and camber deformation.

Keywords

fringe projection wing kinematics moth three-dimensional reconstruction 

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Copyright information

© Jilin University 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision InstrumentsTsinghua UniversityBeijingP. R. China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision InstrumentsTsinghua UniversityBeijingP. R. China

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