Emerging pollutants, and communicating the science of environmental chemistry and mass spectrometry: Pharmaceuticals in the environment

Account and Perspective

Abstract

While this paper is to a large degree targeted for those not familiar with mass spectrometry, [for an overview of mass spectrometry, a number of excellent websites are available, including http://base-peak.wiley.com/links/Resources/Educational_Resources], the primary focus is on the importance of mass spectrometry in ultimately protecting public health and minimizing risks of chemical exposure. Its other audience is those who practice in this specialized field. Should this subject not interest you, by reading this article you can discover among other things, why elevator rides can be important for your career and for your discipline. Why acetaminophen is used for brown tree snakes, or lipid-lowering drugs for pigeons.

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Copyright information

© American Society for Mass Spectrometry 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Environmental Sciences DivisionNational Exposure Research Laboratory, Environmental Protection AgencyLas VegasUSA

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