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Heat flux through slag film and its crystallization behavior

  • Ping Tang
  • Chu-shao Xu
  • Guang-hua Wen
  • Yan-hong Zhao
  • Xin Qi
Article

Abstract

An experimental apparatus for simulating copper mold is used to quantify the heat flux through the slag film and to obtain a solid slag for further determining its crystallization behavior. The result indicates that both the chemical composition of the mold powder and the cooling rate have an important influence on the heat flux through the slag film. With increasing the binary basicity, the heat flux of slag film decreases at first, reaches the minimum at the basicity of 1.4, and then increases, indicating that the maximum binary basicity is about 1.4 for selecting “mild cooling” mold powder. The heat transfer through the slag film can be specified in terms of the crystalline ratio and the thickness of the slag film. Recrystallization of the solid slag occurs and must be considered as an important factor that may influence the heat transfer through the solid slag layer.

Key words

continuous casting mold powder slag film heat flux crystallization 

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Copyright information

© China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ping Tang
    • 1
  • Chu-shao Xu
    • 1
  • Guang-hua Wen
    • 1
  • Yan-hong Zhao
    • 1
  • Xin Qi
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Materials Science and EngineeringChongqing UniversityChongqingChina

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