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Lipid-Based Drug Delivery System (LBDDS): An Emerging Paradigm to Enhance Oral Bioavailability of Poorly Soluble Drugs

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Abstract

Low-oral bioavailability as a consequence of low-water solubility of drugs is challenging for formulation scientists in the development of new pharmaceutical products. This review aims to highlight relevant considerations when implementing a rational strategy for the development of lipid-based oral drug delivery systems and to discuss shortcomings and challenges to the current classification of these delivery systems such as nanoemulsion, Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN), Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), Self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS). Lipid-based drug delivery systems consist of a diverse group of formulations, each consisting of varying functional and structural properties that are amenable to modifications achieved by varying the composition of lipid excipients and other additives thereby facilitating the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. In addition, lipid nanoparticles may also protect the loaded drugs from chemical and enzymatic degradation and gradually release drug molecules from the lipid matrix into the blood, resulting in improved therapeutic profiles compared to free drugs. Therefore, due to their physiological and biodegradable properties, lipid molecules may decrease adverse side effects and chronic toxicity of the drug-delivery systems when compared to others of polymeric nature. Accordingly, the present review is mainly centred on the various lipid-based drug delivery system and excipients used in lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS).

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Kesharwani, R., Jaiswal, P., Patel, D.K. et al. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery System (LBDDS): An Emerging Paradigm to Enhance Oral Bioavailability of Poorly Soluble Drugs. Biomedical Materials & Devices 1, 648–663 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s44174-022-00041-0

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