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Interconnected challenges: an ethical discussion of climate change through the jellyfish metaphor

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Abstract

The pervasive global effects of climate change pose an imminent threat to individuals and nations around the world and highlight the fact that we are unprepared for the potential consequences. This essay acknowledges the urgency of decisive action and takes a nuanced and ethical approach that places the intricate interplay between individual behavior and the profound consequences of climate change at the center of the discussion. The essay uses the metaphor of the jellyfish to symbolically appeal to our moral consciousness. It draws a parallel between humanity today and mindless consumers that have the potential to devour our own world. This comparison highlights the need for a thorough understanding of the interconnected challenges we face and highlights the essential link between the irresponsible consumerism represented by the jellyfish-like behavior and the overarching problem of climate change. The link between these elements is made clear through the lens of economic capitalism, highlighting the role of such systems in perpetuating unsustainable consumption patterns, and causing the global climate crisis. Our nuanced proposals on climate change are based on ethical and social science insights and emphasize the link between individual behavior and its impact on the climate. The moral philosophy encourages us to rethink our role as stewards of the earth and to accentuate the ethical dimensions of our actions.

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Correspondence to Zuhriddin Juraev.

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Ahn, YJ., Juraev, Z. Interconnected challenges: an ethical discussion of climate change through the jellyfish metaphor. SN Soc Sci 4, 36 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s43545-024-00851-7

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