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Asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar coordination during trunk rotation between adolescents with and without thoracic idiopathic scoliosis

Abstract

Study design

Cross-sectional comparative study.

Purpose

To compare thoracic-lumbar kinematic changes and coordination based on coupling angles (CAs) in two different directions of trunk rotation between adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and control subjects.

Summary of background data

Altered three-dimensional (3D) deviations are often apparent in AIS groups during functional activities, such as gait. However, there is a lack of consistent evidence on coordinated motions during different directions of trunk rotation.

Methods

This study included 14 AIS and 17 age-matched control subjects who were all right limb dominant. A motion capture system was utilized to analyze the spinal segment motions. The outcome measures included range of motion (ROM) at the first thoracic (T1), seventh thoracic (T7), and first lumbar (L1) spinous processes as well as the sacral tubercle (S1). The CAs compared in-phase (rotation from right to left) and anti-phase (rotation from left to right) trunk rotations.

Results

Although there was no significant association with the spinal segments in the control group, the Cobb angle demonstrated significant positive correlations with anti-phase at T7 and L1 as well as in-phase at L1. Regarding the CAs, the groups demonstrated a significant interaction with both phases (F = 4.7, p = 0.04). The AIS group demonstrated positive correlations with ROM during in-phase at L1 and anti-phase at T7 and L1.

Conclusion

The coordination based on the CAs of the lumbar spine relative to the thoracic spine significantly decreased during left to right trunk rotation in the AIS group. These results indicated that the AIS group demonstrated directional dissociation toward the dominant side of lumbar rotation.

Level of evidence

III.

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Funding

No funding was received for this work.

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Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

PS: Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work. Acquisition of data for work. PS/MP, Analysis of data for the work. Interpretation of data for the work. Drafting the work for important intellectual content. Critical revision of the work for important intellectual content. Final approval of the version to be published. Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Paul S. Sung.

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Conflict of interest

No financial or personal conflicts of interest in relation to the submission of this paper, other people, or any organizations.

Ethical approval

This retrospective chart review study involving human participants was in accordance with the ethical standards of the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Korea University (0816A2 and 1225A3) approved this study. We thank Dr. WH Park and graduate students at Korea University for their critical analyses of the important intellectual content and interpretation of data.

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Sung, P.S., Park, M.S. Asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar coordination during trunk rotation between adolescents with and without thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. Spine Deform 10, 783–790 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s43390-022-00483-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s43390-022-00483-y

Keywords

  • Idiopathic scoliosis
  • Asymmetry
  • Thorax
  • Cobb angle