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The atonic stomach: a dangerous condition prior to scoliosis surgery

Abstract

A dilated atonic stomach as part of neuromuscular or syndromic disorders can have devastating results after scoliosis surgery. Patients can be asymptomatic preoperatively and non-clinical signs can be easily overlooked. Awareness of the condition, however, can prevent severe complications such as aspiration.

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PRU M.D.: made substantial contributions to the design of the work, data collection and analysis. Drafted the work. Writing-original draft preparation. Approves the final version of the manuscript to be published and agrees to be accountable for all the aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. CWB M.D., Ph.D.: made substantial contributions to the design of the work, data collection and analysis. Helped writing the original draft. Revised the work critically and approves the final version of the manuscript to be published. Agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. MHL M.D., Ph.D.: made substantial contributions to the design of the work, data collection and analysis. Helped writing the original draft. Revised the work critically and approves the final version of the manuscript to be published. Agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. MCK M.D., Ph.D.: made substantial contributions to the design of the work, data collection and analysis. Helped writing the original draft. Revised the work critically and approves the final version of the manuscript to be published. Also agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

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Correspondence to P. R. van Urk.

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van Urk, P.R., Bollen, C.W., Lequin, M.H. et al. The atonic stomach: a dangerous condition prior to scoliosis surgery. Spine Deform 10, 965–967 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s43390-021-00469-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s43390-021-00469-2

Keywords

  • Scoliosis
  • Stomach
  • Surgery