Longevity records for some passerines of central Brazil

Abstract

In the tropics, birds produce smaller clutches and have a higher risk of nest predation when compared to those in the temperate region. Consequently, a high annual adult survival and a long lifespan are expected for tropical birds. Although determining longevity is a key step towards understanding the life-history strategies of wildlife, the lifespan of Neotropical birds is poorly studied for this region. Here we report the minimum longevity of 11 avian species of central Brazil, some of which are endemic species of the Cerrado and Atlantic Forest biomes. The data presented are from different studies of bird ecology that used the mark-recapture method. The oldest bird recorded was a female Helmeted Manakin Antilophia galeata at the minimum age of 15 years and 3 months old. We also unexpectedly recorded a Chestnut-headed Tanager Pyrrhocoma ruficeps (7 years, 6 months), a species usually restricted to southern Brazil. Our observations are comparable to other studies in the Neotropics that report high longevity and site fidelity traits for passerines in this region.

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The authors confirm that the data supporting the findings of this study are available within the article.

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Acknowledgments

We thank the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior–Brasil (CAPES) (Finance Code 001) for supporting the authors with scholarships during their Master’s degree (EFSJ and MFK), PhD (LNK), and Postdoctoral fellowship (PD, grant number: 88887.469218/2019-00). PD research was also supported by the Centro Universitário de Brasília (UniCEUB) with a scientific initiation scholarship in 2008. We are also grateful to the Graduate Program in Ecology at the University of Brasilia and the staff of Fazenda Água Limpa (FAL) for their support during our fieldwork. We thank Fernanda Fernandes for providing photographs of the banded male Coal-crested Finch. Finally, we also thank Regina H. Macedo, Daniel Branch, and two anonymous reviewers for their suggestions on the manuscript.

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Funding

Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior–Brasil (CAPES) (Finance Code 001) supported the authors with scholarships during their master’s degree (EFSJ and MFK), PhD (LNK), and Postdoctoral work (PD, grant number: 88887.469218/2019-00). PD’s research was also supported by the Centro Universitário de Brasília (UniCEUB) with a scientific initiation scholarship in 2008.

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EFSJ wrote the first draft of the manuscript and recorded the Coal-crested Finch with at least 10 years of age. LNK, PD, and MFK collected mark-recapture data of birds. All authors read, contributed, and approved the final version of this manuscript.

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Correspondence to Edvaldo Ferreira Silva-Jr.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethics approval

Data collection in Fazenda Água Limpa (FAL) during LNK’s PhD was carried out under permission from Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade (ICMBio) (permission no. 58094-3) and a bird banding permit provided by Centro Nacional de Pesquisa e Conservação de Aves Silvestres (CEMAVE) (license no. 4221/1). MFK banded birds in FAL as part of project no. 676 for which banding permits were provided by Sistema Nacional de Anilhamento de Aves Silvestres (SNA). All procedures by LNK, MFK, and PD were performed in accordance with the Guidelines to the Use of Wild Birds in Research of the Ornithological Council (Fair and Jones 2010).

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The authors give their consent for publication of this manuscript in Ornithology Research.

Additional information

Communicated by Fábio R. Amaral

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Silva-Jr, E.F., Kajiki, L.N., Diniz, P. et al. Longevity records for some passerines of central Brazil. Ornithol. Res. 28, 258–262 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s43388-021-00033-6

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Keywords

  • Aging
  • Lifespan
  • Mark-recapture
  • Neotropical birds
  • Senescence