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Meaning in Life as a Mediator of the Relationship Between Intrinsic Religiosity and Depression Symptoms

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the mediating effect of meaning in life on the relationship between intrinsic religiosity and depression symptoms. A non-clinical sample of 279 participants answered an online survey. The mean age of participants was 33.19 years old and 72% of them were female. The participants answered the following self-report measures: Intrinsic Religiosity Inventory, Meaning in Life Questionnaire, and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. Three regression equations were used to test the research hypothesis. In the first regression model, intrinsic religiosity was a statistically significant predictor of meaning in life. In the second model, intrinsic religiosity was a statistically significant predictor of depression symptoms. However, in the third model, when meaning in life was incorporated into the regression model, along with intrinsic religiosity, as possible predictors of depression symptoms, only meaning in life proved to be a statistically significant predictor. The results corroborate the hypothesis that meaning in life mediates the relationship between intrinsic religiosity and depression symptoms. Therefore, intrinsic religiosity has a protective effect against depression symptoms; however, it occurs indirectly, via meaning in life.

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Funding

This study was funded by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq).

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Correspondence to João Campos.

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Campos, J., Bredemeier, J. & Trentini, C. Meaning in Life as a Mediator of the Relationship Between Intrinsic Religiosity and Depression Symptoms. Trends in Psychol. 28, 560–568 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s43076-020-00036-0

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Keywords

  • Depression
  • Religiosity
  • Meaning in life